Y’all, PLEASE do Howard a favor and eat in this big ass cafeteria! Lol.

Y’all, PLEASE do Howard a favor and eat in this big ass cafeteria! Lol.

I just don’t know how they could do it. May he rest in peace. #MikeBrown

I just don’t know how they could do it. May he rest in peace. #MikeBrown

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Yeah, Jackie Robinson West!

Yeah, Jackie Robinson West!

A sprained ankle ain’t gonna stop me from getting my brunch on!

A sprained ankle ain’t gonna stop me from getting my brunch on!

Congratulations to the Jackie Robinson West Little League on winning the US title!!! Take on South Korea, guys! Chicago’s proud of you! #Chicago

Congratulations to the Jackie Robinson West Little League on winning the US title!!! Take on South Korea, guys! Chicago’s proud of you! #Chicago

I was supposed to live in the West Towers…

I was supposed to live in the West Towers…

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DO THIS BY AUGUST 29!!!

DO THIS BY AUGUST 29!!!

When You Say “Black-on-Black Crime,” What Type of Crime are You Talking About?

Whenever a murder of a Black person by a White person surfaces, there is outrage. There is activism. There are protests. There is…”Black-on-Black crime?” Yes—in recent news, there is a divergence from these recent murders of Black people by Whites people to “unrest” in Black communities, as if there is some kind of relationship. To put it simply: Black and White people always feel the need to bring up crime in Black communities (because, yeah, that shit don’t happen in White communities). But here is the problem: when both sides (and more) cry “Black-on-Black crime,” what type of crime are they talking about, specifically? Exactly what are these criminal acts that “concern” them (because are they really concerned)? Or are you referring to gang and gun violence? True, gang violence exists. True, gun violence exists. But are these the only acts in our communities? How about these crimes below:

*Domestic violence
(This is probably a good time to point out that Black women face a greater risk of domestic violence than White women. But let’s be very clear—women AND men experience it REGARDLESS of sexual orientation)
*Child abuse
*Homophobia (Remember Sakia Gunn? But we don’t fuck with LGBT people like that, right?)
*Transphobia (http://nbjc.org/issues/transgender-equality)
*Drug abuse & dealing (marijuana*, crack, coke, prescription pills, etc.)
*Theft (shoplifting, automobile, etc.)
*Hazing
*Statutory rape
*RAPE (but confronting interracial rape is an “attack” on Black men…)
*Pedophilia
*Sexual assault
*Cyberbullying (yes-states have laws against this)
*Stalking
*Elderly abuse

AND. MORE. But let’s stop here.

To conclude this post, there is a shit load of illegal activities happening in the Black community. The question is, DO we really care about those activities? Is there interest to call out homophobia and transphobia? I see a lot of finger pointing rather than encouragement to get involved in our communities. OH WAIT-we DO raise such awareness! But keep on thinking Black people are a bunch of animals who viciously murdering each other. While you focus on that, other races do the EXACT SAME THINGS. Because, let’s think about it: is stealing someone’s wallet worse than the Ponzi scheme, or a boat load of these crimes? So when you say “Black-on-Black crime,” ask yourself:

1. Do you even give a fuck?
2. Are you saying this to dismiss the institutional racism that continues to prevail in America?
3. When the OKC Bombing, Columbine, NIU, Aurora, and Sandy Hook occurred, did you ever use the term “White-on-White crime?”
4. Do you believe anti-Blackness exists?

PS—And for someone who mentors and has advocated for the end to gun violence, I have every right to call out bullshit. If you consider me a “race baiter” or something even more ridiculous, Google is your friend (and reading some of these links might help, too).

odinsblog:

Five Myths About Crime in Black America—and the Statistical Truths

In the wake of Trayvon Martin’s death [and Renisha McBride and Jonathan Ferrell], we’ve seen a lot of discussion of the larger societal issues that play into how and when people are perceived as criminals. There were hoodies, there were marches, and there were frank talks from parent to child about how to minimize the danger of being a young person of color. On the other side, there were justifications of George Zimmerman’s actions: a smear campaign against Martin’s character, and plenty of writers explaining that statistically, blacks are simply more dangerous to be around.

That framing ignores the realities behind the numbers. Here are five myths about crime and people of color.

Shani O. Hilton

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